Root of Bitterness: Documents of the Social History of American Women

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Northeastern University Press #ad - This edition contains about twenty selections from the original volume and almost sixty new ones. Presenting a diverse collection of documents, root of bitterness reaches from the colonial era through the nineteenth century, diversity and conflict among women, women's collective efforts, the power of gender, focusing on six dominant themes: women's work, the physical body, and women's relation to state authority.

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Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America

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Oxford University Press #ad - She spent the next decade of her life traveling throughout Massachusetts, working as a teacher, making intimate female friends, and becoming the subject of gossip wherever she lived. Revered by their community, served as guiding lights within their church, Charity and Sylvia operated a tailor shop employing many local women, and participated in raising their many nieces and nephews.

Charity and sylvia is the intimate history of their extraordinary forty-four year union. A brilliant and strong-willed woman with a clear attraction for her own sex, Charity found herself banished from her family home at age twenty. But as rachel hope cleves demonstrates in this eye-opening book, same-sex marriage is hardly new.

Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America #ad - Born in 1777, charity Bryant was raised in Massachusetts. Providing an illuminating glimpse into a relationship that turns conventional notions of same-sex marriage on their head, and reveals early America to be a place both more diverse and more accommodating than modern society might imagine, Charity and Sylvia is a significant contribution to our limited knowledge of LGBT history in early America.

. The two soon became so inseparable that Charity decided to rent rooms in Weybridge. In 1809, essentially, and over the years, they moved into their own home together, came to be recognized, as a married couple. There she met a pious and studious young woman named Sylvia Drake. Drawing on an array of original documents including diaries, letters, and poetry, Cleves traces their lives in sharp detail.

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Harriet Tubman and the Fight for Freedom: A Brief History with Documents The Bedford Series in History and Culture

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Bedford/St. Martin's #ad - In the introduction to this compelling volume, Lois Horton reveals the woman behind the legend and addresses the ways in which Tubman's mythic status emerged in her own lifetime and beyond. Harriet tubman is a legendary figure in the history of American slavery and the Underground Railroad. A rich collection of accompanying documents — including the fugitive slave acts, letters, newspaper articles, advertisements and tributes to Tubman — shed light on Tubman's relationships with key abolitionist figures such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison; her role in the women's rights movement; and her efforts on behalf of fugitive slaves and freed blacks through the Civil War and beyond.

Harriet Tubman and the Fight for Freedom: A Brief History with Documents The Bedford Series in History and Culture #ad - Going beyond mere biography, the underground railroad, Horton weaves through Tubman's story the larger history of slavery, the antislavery movement, the increasing sectionalism of the pre-Civil War era, as well as the war and post-war Reconstruction. A chronology of tubman's life, along with questions for consideration and a selected bibliography, enhance this important volume.

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Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - By examining six realms of encounter--first contact, warfare, and captivity--Barr shows that native categories of gender provided the political structure of Indian-Spanish relations by defining people's identity, diplomacy, settlement and intermarriage, status, mission life, and obligations vis-a-vis others.

Revising the standard narrative of european-Indian relations in America, resist, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, and persevere. Because native systems of kin-based social and political order predominated, argues Barr, Indian concepts of gender cut across European perceptions of racial difference.

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands #ad - . She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s, apaches, Wichitas, Karankawas, Indian peoples including Caddos, Payayas, and Comanches formed relationships with Spaniards in Texas that refuted European claims of imperial control. Barr argues that indians not only retained control over their territories but also imposed control over Spaniards.

Instead of being defined in racial terms, as was often the case with European constructions of power, diplomatic relations between the Indians and Spaniards in the region were dictated by Indian expressions of power, grounded in gendered terms of kinship.

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Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem: Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies The American Social Experience

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NYU Press #ad - The author emphasizes the inextricably linked worlds of the Caribbean and the North American colonies, illustrating how the Puritan worldview was influenced by its perception of possessed Indians. In this important book, the elusive, mysterious, elaine Breslaw claims to have rediscovered Tituba, and often mythologized Indian woman accused of witchcraft in Salem in 1692 and immortalized in Arthur Miller's The Crucible.

Breslaw argues that tituba’s confession to practicing witchcraft clearly reveals her savvy and determined efforts to protect herself by actively manipulating Puritan fears. The first focuses on tituba's roots in Barbados, the second on her life in the New World. This confession, perceived as evidence of a diabolical conspiracy, was the central agent in the cataclysmic series of events that saw 19 people executed and over 150 imprisoned, including a young girl of 5.

Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem: Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies The American Social Experience #ad - A landmark contribution to women's history and early American history, Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem sheds new light on one of the most painful episodes in American history, through the eyes of its most crucial participant. The uniquely multicultural nature of life on a seventeenth-century Barbadan sugar plantation—defined by a mixture of English, American Indian, and African ways and folklore—indelibly shaped the young Tituba's world and the mental images she brought with her to Massachusetts.

Breslaw divides Tituba’s story into two parts. Reconstructing the life of the slave woman at the center of the notorious Salem witch trials, the book follows Tituba from her likely origins in South America to Barbados, forcefully dispelling the commonly-held belief that Tituba was African.

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Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: The American Portraits Series

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Hill and Wang #ad - Resistance, espionage, collaboration, deception: pocahontas's life is here shown as a road map to Native American strategies of defiance exercised in the face of overwhelming odds and in the hope for a semblance of independence worth the name. Townsend's pocahontas emerges--as a young child on the banks of the Chesapeake, an influential noblewoman visiting a struggling Jamestown, an English gentlewoman in London--for the first time in three-dimensions; allowing us to see and sympathize with her people as never before.

. Indeed, always aware of their material disadvantages, Pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, brought against the military power of the colonizing English. Camilla townsend's stunning new book, differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth century Native Americans were--in the way they saw, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma, understood, and struggled to control their world-not only to the invading British but to ourselves.

Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: The American Portraits Series #ad - Neither naïve nor innocent, indians like Pocahontas and her father, the powerful king Powhatan, diplomacy, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, and violence.

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Celia, a Slave

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University of Georgia Press #ad - Over the next five years, celia bore Newsom two children; meanwhile, she became involved with a slave named George and resolved at his insistence to end the relationship with her master. When newsom refused, celia one night struck him fatally with a club and disposed of his body in her fireplace. Her act quickly discovered, Celia was brought to trial.

He then established her in a small cabin near his house and visited her regularly most likely with the knowledge of the son and two daughters who lived with him. Mclaurin focuses sharply on the role of gender, exploring the degree to which female slaves were sexually exploited, the conditions that often prevented white women from stopping such abuse, and the inability of male slaves to defend slave women.

Celia was found guilty and hanged. Melton A. Illuminating the moral dilemmas that lie at the heart of a slaveholding society, this book tells the story of a young slave who was sexually exploited by her master and ultimately executed for his murder. Celia was only fourteen years old when she was acquired by John Newsom, an aging widower and one of the most prosperous and respected citizens of Callaway County, Missouri.

Celia, a Slave #ad - She received a surprisingly vigorous defense from her court-appointed attorneys, who built their case on a state law allowing women the use of deadly force to defend their honor. After purchasing celia in a neighboring county, Newsom raped her on the journey back to his farm. Setting the case in the context of the 1850s slavery debates, he also probes the manner in which the legal system was used to justify slavery.

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Feminism: A Very Short Introduction Very Short Introductions

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OUP Oxford #ad - These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, perspective, analysis, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable. Margaret walters touches on the difficulties and inequities that women still face more than forty years after the 'new wave' of 1960s feminism, such as how successful women are at combining domesticity, motherhood, and work outside the house.

How much have women's lives really changed? In the West women still come up against the 'glass ceiling' at work, most earning considerably less than their male counterparts. What are we to make of the now commonplace insistence that feminism deprives men of their rights and dignities? And how does one tackle the issue of female emancipation in different cultural and economic environments - in, the Indian sub-continent, and Africa?This book provides an historical account of feminism, the liberation of the sixties, exploring its earliest roots as well as key issues including voting rights, the Middle East, for example, and its relevance today.

Feminism: A Very Short Introduction Very Short Introductions #ad - She brings the subject completely up to date by providing an analysisof the current situation of women across the globe, from Europe and the United States to Third World countries. About the series: the very short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area.

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Looking Good: College Women and Body Image, 1875-1930 Gender Relations in the American Experience

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JHUP #ad - Clarke's framed the debate over a woman's place in higher education almost exclusively in terms of her body and her health. For historian Margaret A. In looking good, smith college, lowe examines the ways in which college women at three quite different institutions -- Cornell University, and Spelman College -- regarded their own bodies in this period.

At the same time, the "college girl" was a novelty that tested new ideas about feminine beauty, sexuality, and athleticism. Contrasting white and black students, lowe draws on student diaries, secular and religious environments, and Northern and Southern attitudes, and publications; institutional records; and accounts in the popular press to examine the process by which new, single-sex and coeducational schools, letters, twentieth-century ideals of the female body took hold in America.

. A girl could study and learn, " Dr. Edward clarke warned in his widely read 1873 book sex in Education, uterine disease, and a future secure from neuralgia, "but she could not do all this and retain uninjured health, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system. For half a century, ideas such as Dr.

Looking Good: College Women and Body Image, 1875-1930 Gender Relations in the American Experience #ad - Lowe, this obsession offers one of the clearest expressions of the social and cultural meanings given to the female body between 1875 and 1930 Toward the end of the nineteenth century, as young women began entering college in greater numbers than ever before, physicians and social critics charged that campus life posed grave hazards to the female constitution and women's reproductive health.

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Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation

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Harvard University Press #ad - Public vows is a panoramic view of marriage's political history, revealing the national government's profound role in our most private of choices. And even the immense social and legal changes of the last third of the twentieth century have not unraveled official reliance on marriage as a "pillar of the state.

By excluding some kinds of marriages and encouraging others, as well as its moral and social standards, marital policies have helped to sculpt the nation's citizenry, and have directly affected national understandings of gender roles and racial difference. We commonly think of marriage as a private matter between two people, a personal expression of love and commitment.

Cott demonstrates that marriage is and always has been a public institution. From the founding of the united states to the present day, imperatives about the necessity of marriage and its proper form have been deeply embedded in national policy, law, and political rhetoric. Legislators and judges have envisioned and enforced their preferred model of consensual, lifelong monogamy--a model derived from Christian tenets and the English common law that posits the husband as provider and the wife as dependent.

Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation #ad - In early confrontations with native americans, through the invention of the New Deal, and immigrant spouses, Mormon polygamists, and welfare programs, federal income tax, emancipated slaves, the federal government consistently influenced the shape of marriages. In this pioneering history, Nancy F. No one who reads this book will think of marriage in the same way again.

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The Murder of Helen Jewett

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Vintage #ad - Patricia cline cohen goes behind these first lurid accounts to reconstruct the story of the mysterious victim, Helen Jewett. Through her meticulous and ingenious research, Patricia Cline Cohen traces his life there and the many twists and turns of the lingering mystery of the murder. He stood trial in a five-day courtroom drama that ended with his acquittal amid the cheers of hundreds of fellow clerks and other spectators.

With no conviction for murder, nor closure of any sort, the case continued to tantalize the public, even though Richard Robinson disappeared from view. Through the erie canal, and by way of new Orleans, down the Ohio and the Mississippi, he reached the wilds of Texas and a new life under a new name. The son of an established Connecticut family, he was intense, arrogant, and given to posturing.

The Murder of Helen Jewett #ad - She invented life stories for herself that helped her build a sympathetic clientele among New York City's elite, and she further captivated her customers through her seductive letters, which mixed elements of traditional feminine demureness with sexual boldness. But she was to meet her match--and her nemesis--in a youth called Richard Robinson.

He became helen jewett's lover in a tempestuous affair and ten months later was arrested for her murder. Her stunning portrayals of helen jewett, contradictions, colorful nineteenth-century world make vivid a frenetic city life and sexual morality whose complexities, and their raffish, Robinson, and concerns resonate with those of our own time.

From her beginnings as a servant girl in Maine, using four successive aliases, Helen Jewett refashioned herself, into a highly paid courtesan.

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